Courses

REGISTER HERE FOR FALL 2020 COURSES

HISTORY DEPARTMENT COURSE OFFERINGS  FALL 2020

Undergraduate

Petitions are required for first-year students to take 100-level or higher courses, and for sophomores to take 300-level or higher courses. 300-level courses must be taken for four credits at the undergraduate level. HU fills humanities distribution requirements; SS fills social science requirements; ND not designated

CRN 44773     HIST 012-011                  Inventing the Modern World
The rise of modern nation states; the scientific and industrial revolutions; social movements and the French and Russian revolutions; impact of Enlightenment philosophy, nationalism, liberalism, imperialism and fascism; the development of modern class structure and transformations in gender relations, art, popular culture and society.
CRN 44261       HIST 015-010                English Revolutions
The Protestant Reformation, the Civil Wars, and the Glorious Revolution, from Henry the Eighth to John Locke. Examines how three bloody conflicts gave birth to the first modern society. Explores the origins of empire, capitalism, secularization, nationalism, and democracy.
CRN 44041       HIST 021-010                Greek History
The development of civilization from paleolithic times to the world empire of Alexander the Great.The social, economic, religious, philosophic, artistic, and literary development of the ancient world; the origin of political institutions.
CRN 44997       HIST 043-010                The United States Since 1941 CRN 45003       HIST 043-011
World War II; Cold War at home and abroad; Civil Rights movement; the 1960s: Vietnam, the welfare state and social upheavals; new forms of cultural expression; feminism; rise of neoconservatism.

CRN 42969       HIST 049-010                The True Road to Eldorado: Colonial Latin American History

Examines the initial encounters of peoples of Iberian and African origins with the indigenous civilizations of the Western Hemisphere. Explores the development of a colonial economy and its global reach. Focuses on the birth of a distinctive Latin American society and culture, with attention to the Latin American patriots who fought for their freedom. No prior knowledge of Latin American history required.
CRN 42908       HIST 075-010                Chinese Civilization
This course reviews the evolution of Chinese culture from the Neolithic up to the end of the imperial age in 1911. While the framework is historical, students are exposed to all facets of what defines civilization, including social traditions, philosophy, religion, material culture, literature, art and architecture, military science, education, law, and institutional history. Students are encouraged to continue their study of China afterwards with the course on Modern Chinese Civilization.
CRN 41411       HIST 090-010                Policing in Modern US History
The U.S. has the world’s largest prison population, with over 2 million people presently incarcerated. How did it reach this point of mass incarceration? This course explores the roots of the carceral state from the late-1900s to the present. It examines the relationship between prisons and race, gender, sexuality, and class, and covers topics such as convict labor, the war on drugs, prison activism, immigrant detention, and the “prison industrial complex.” We will read scholarship on incarceration alongside firsthand prison narratives, legal documents, literature, and more."
CRN 43690       HIST 090-011                 Wild, Wild West
Introduction to the American West as both region and process. Investigates the diverse populations living in the west, including Native Americans, Mexicans, American settlers, miners, and cowboys, and Chinese railroad workers. Explore the process of first Spanish/Mexican and Russian and then U.S. expansion into the region and the west. Themes includes the evolution of land use, immigration, cultural life, social and changing technologies.

CRN 42415 HIST 090-013             America Goes to the Middle East
Discusses the history of relations between the United States and the Middle East from the nineteenth century to the present through the stories of a diverse cast of characters from missionaries to marines. Topics include travel, food, migration, imperialism, war, and transnational appeal of American pop culture.
CRN 44722 HIST 090-015              Origins of Modern Democracy
This course considers the promise and perils of democracy by investigating the origins of modern democratic government in seventeenth-century England and America. Students will also discover the power of historical analysis in a rapidly changing world. History will emerge as a vital tool for understanding how societies are transformed. Skills acquired include causal analysis, empathy, interpretation, source criticism, information management, digital methods, and argumentative writing. This course can be counted as an equivalent of HIST 001 for History majors.
CRN 44983 HIST 097-011            History of Rock and Roll
This introductory seminar explores American culture through the history of Rock & Roll. Approaching rock music as a rich historical text, it surveys the mid to late-twentieth century through critical analysis of musical greats like
Elvis Presley, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, and an array of other influential artists. Students will examine written sources, podcasts, film, and the music itself to understand how Rock & Roll both mirrored and moved modern society.
CRN 43634 HIST 149-010            Narcos: The Global Drug Wars
Tobacco, sugar, coffee, opium, marijuana, cocaine. From Columbus’s encounter with the New World to the rise and demise of Pablo Escobar and “El Chapo” Guzmán, drugs have been coveted global commodities. Through readings, discussions, and films, this course examines the history of drug production, drug trafficking, and the so-called “war on drugs” in Latin America.
CRN 44774 HIST 154-011          History of the Holocaust
The Nazi Holocaust in its historical, political and religious setting. Emphasis upon the moral, cultural and
theological issues raised by the Holocaust.

CRN 44803 HIST 325-010        History of Sexuality and the Family in the U.S Changing conceptions of sexuality and the role of women, men, and children in the family and society from the colonial to the post World War II era. Emphasis on the significance of socioeconomic class and cultural background. Topics include family structure, birth control, legal constraints, marriage, divorce, and prostitution.

CRN 44994  HIST 352-010       History of Total War  This seminar examines the gradual rise of the idea of total war from the religious and civil wars of the 17th century, through the French Revolution, the Napoleonic War, the American Civil War, the two World Wars, the Cold War, and The War on Terror. We will examine the difference between war as political means and modern warfare as the very ends of politics, religion, and culture.

CRN 44801 HIST 395-012  African Women, Voices & Lives This course traces the changing history and status of African women. It positions their voices and biographies at the center of broader narratives that often perceive them as powerless, emerging from a lineage of poverty and oppression, and without agency. What happens when African women speak for themselves? Memoirs, autobiographies, biographies, and speeches by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Minna Salami, Sisonke Msimang, Winnie Madikizela Mandela, Leila Ahmed, Amina Mama, Queen-mother Yaa Asantewaa, Ingrid Jonker, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Wangari Maathai, and others, embody the reality of their voices and life experiences. We will explore the intersections of gender, class, race and power to emphasize how these women have been instrumental in shaping African history from the 19th century.

CRN 45076  HIST 397-010   Countercultures in American History  Counterculture in the United States is often associated with the hippies of the 1960s yet the country has a rich historical tradition of countercultural thought and expression. Through the lenses of intellectual and cultural history, this course establishes the defining principles and characteristics of counterculture and examines how actors within the modern tradition -- from Transcendentalists to punk rockers -- have critiqued and ultimately influenced mainstream American society. Students will explore innovations in art, spirituality, and political and social theory through close-readings of critical essays, literary novels, modern art, film, advertising campaigns, and even song-lyrics.

Graduate

HIST 325-011   History of Sexuality and the Family in the US        3 credits

Changing conceptions of sexuality and the role of women, men, and children in the family and society from the colonial to the post World War II era. Emphasis on the significance of socioeconomic class and cultural background. Topics include family structure, birth control, legal constraints, marriage, divorce, and prostitution.

HIST 352-011  History of Total War      3 credits

This seminar examines the gradual rise of the idea of total war from the religious and civil wars of the 17th century, through the French Revolution, the Napoleonic War, the American Civil War, the two World Wars, the Cold War, and The War on Terror. We will examine the difference between war as political means and modern warfare as the very ends of politics, religion, and culture.

HIST 395-010    African Women, Voices & Lives   3 credits

This course traces the changing history and status of African women. It positions their voices and biographies at the center of broader narratives that often perceive them as powerless, emerging from a lineage of poverty and oppression, and without agency. What happens when African women speak for themselves? Memoirs, autobiographies, biographies, and speeches by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Minna Salami, Sisonke Msimang, Winnie Madikizela Mandela, Leila Ahmed, Amina Mama, Queen-mother Yaa Asantewaa, Ingrid Jonker, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Wangari Maathai, and others, embody the reality of their voices and life experiences. We will explore the intersections of gender, class, race and power to emphasize how these women have been instrumental in shaping African history from the 19th century.

HIST 397-011   Countercultures in American History    3 credits

Counterculture in the United States is often associated with the hippies of the 1960s yet the country has a rich historical tradition of countercultural thought and expression. Through the lenses of intellectual and cultural history, this course establishes the defining principles and characteristics of counterculture and examines how actors within the modern tradition -- from Transcendentalists to punk rockers -- have critiqued and ultimately influenced mainstream American society. Students will explore innovations in art, spirituality, and political and social theory through close-readings of critical essays, literary novels, modern art, film, advertising campaigns, and even song-lyrics.

HIST 471          Special Topics in History 1-3 Credits

Individual study under the direction of a faculty member of a topic in history.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

HIST 472      Special Topics in History 1-3 Credits.

Individual study under the direction of a faculty member of a topic in history.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

HIST 473       Special Topics in History 1-3 Credits

Individual study under the direction of a faculty member of a topic in history.
Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.

HIST 482      Special Topics    3 Credits

HIST 490       Thesis 1-6 Credits

HIST 495      Readings in Ottoman History

Topics in Transnational Historiography, including immigration, trade, warfare and geopolitics, cultural exchange and intellectual and social movements, through the lens of Ottoman History.

HIST 499      Dissertation 1-15 Credits

Repeat Status: Course may be repeated.